Menu ENLang Search
Lang English العربية 中文 Nederlands Français Deutsch Italiano 日本語 한국어 Português Русский язык Español
Detect
Leilah Babirye, Hugh Hayden, Dozie Kanu, Tau Lewis, and Kiyan Williams: Black Atlantic

Leilah Babirye, Hugh Hayden, Dozie Kanu, Tau Lewis, and Kiyan Williams: Black Atlantic

About the Exhibition

Displayed on the shores of this former shipping port, Black Atlantic is an exhibition inspired by the diaspora across the ocean that connects Africa with the Americas and Europe. Over the centuries, these transatlantic networks have led to complex hybrid cultures and identities like those of the five artists featured in Black Atlantic. Each commission suggests a unique creative approach towards crafting new identities and futures through the personal gestures of hand-made work, often in dialogue with the processes of large-scale fabrication. The artists have mined both global histories and personal experiences to create these compelling works, which are as inventive in form and materials as they are powerful in their themes.

Black Atlantic is co-curated by artist Hugh Hayden and Public Art Fund Adjunct Curator Daniel S. Palmer. 

Download Press Release

About the Artworks

Agali Awamu (Togetherness), 2022
Leilah Babirye (b. 1985, Kampala, Uganda; lives and works in Brooklyn, NY) presents two new groups of monumental wood sculptures in white pine. She carved these figurative forms by hand and chainsaw, drawing on her training in traditional African techniques. Babirye has embellished them by burning, burnishing, and adorning them with welded metal and found discarded materials in ways that transform the refuse into something spectacular, showing its intrinsic value. These sculptures, which she calls “trans queens,” are intended to “stand proud as beacons of freedom that welcome an international LGBTQ+ community.”

Gulf Stream, 2022
Hugh Hayden (b. 1983, Dallas, TX; lives and works in New York, NY) conceived this exhibition and has also contributed this surreal artwork to Black Atlantic. Hayden has combined a clinker-built boat hull exterior with a whale like skeletal interior to create this empty vessel washed ashore. The form and “Gulf Stream” title simultaneously reference and “remix” an 1899 painting by Winslow Homer of a lone Black figure in dire circumstances on a wrecked boat at sea and Kerry James Marshall’s 2003 reinterpretation that has transformed the scene to one of leisure. Hayden sees his Gulf Stream sculpture as “both a boat and a body, whose unknown passengers may have made it to safety or have been swallowed by the sea.”

On Elbows, 2022
Dozie Kanu (b. 1993, Houston, TX; lives and works in Santarém, Portugal) has created an ensemble of surreal objects that highlights the tensions between public and private aspects of the self. A vessel of black liquid that pulses at the rate of a human heartbeat and a chaise longue chair (typically associated with psychoanalysis) cast in concrete evoke self-reflection and also the murky depths of the individual and collective unconscious. The sofa’s “Texan Wire Wheels” rims (also referred to as “elbows” or “swangas”) reference the vibrant automobile “SLAB culture” of the artist’s native Houston. He describes the customization of cars within this tradition as a “free and playful fashioning of one’s own material property – gestures that I find deeply complex and layered given the relationship that Black Americans continue to navigate between ownership and agency.”

We pressed our bellies together and kicked our feet, we became something so alien that we no longer had natural predators, 2022.
We watched humankind evolve as we absorbed into the sea floor, the moon stared down at us and told us the Earth had a heavy heart, 2022.
We wondered if the angels had abandoned us, or if they simply changed shape without letting us know. Every night creatures vanished, every morning strangers would arrive, 2022.

Tau Lewis (b. 1993, Toronto, Canada; lives and works in Brooklyn, NY) was inspired to make these three six-foot diameter cast iron sculptures by her “years of fascination with crinoids,” a family of marine creatures that includes starfish, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and their prehistoric ancestors. These animals each have stacked disc-shaped stems with unique designs. Their five-pointed symmetry is reflected in Lewis’s sculptures, with repeated patterns that incorporate West African Adinkra symbols. The artist’s castings “ruminate on the wandering of these ancient animals, the global dispersal of their fossilized bodies, and their coexistence with Black bodies above and below the Atlantic and throughout the diaspora.”

Ruins of Empire, 2022
Kiyan Williams (b. 1991, Newark, NJ; lives and works in New York, NY) envisions the “ruins of empire” by reimagining an iconic symbol of American values, The Statue of Freedom. The bronze monument designed by Thomas Crawford has stood atop the dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. since 1863 (a structure built using enslaved labor). The soil surface of the artist’s adaptation makes the sculpture appear to be in a state of decomposition and decay, “embodying how American ideals of freedom are tied to subjugation, drawing inspiration from sci-fi tropes of a destroyed monument like the Statue of Liberty as a symbol for a world ruined by environmental devastation.”

About the Artists

Leilah Babirye (born 1985, Kampala, Uganda) is an artist and activist who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She studied art at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda (2007–2010), and participated in the Fire Island Artist Residency in 2015. The artist fled her native Uganda to New York in 2015 after being publicly outed in a local newspaper. In spring 2018, Babirye was granted asylum with support from the African Services Committee and the NYC Anti-Violence Project. Throughout her multidisciplinary practice, Babirye transforms wood, ceramic, found materials, and paint into figurative subjects that address issues surrounding identity, sexuality, and human rights. Babirye explores the diversity of LGBTQI identities and endows each subject with regal dignity and expressive, tactile beauty. Recent exhibitions include Ebika Bya ba Kuchu mu Buganda (Kuchu Clans of Buganda) at Gordon Robichaux, New York and Los Angeles and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London;  Flight: A Collective History at the Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (curated by Serubiri Moses); Stonewall 50 at the Contemporary Arts Museum (CAMH), Houston, Texas; and at Socrates Sculpture Park where she presented two monumental commissioned sculptures.

Hugh Hayden (b. 1983, Dallas, Texas) considers the anthropomorphizing of the natural world as a visceral lens to explore the human condition. Utilizing wood as his primary medium, Hayden transforms familiar objects through a process of selection, carving and juxtaposition to challenge our perceptions of ourselves, others and the environment. Working with objects loaded with multi-layered histories as varied as discarded trunks, rare indigenous timbers, Christmas trees or souvenir African sculptures, he often combines disparate species, creating new composite forms that also reflect their complex cultural backgrounds. Hayden lives and works in New York City; he holds an MFA from Columbia University and a Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University. Hayden’s recent solo exhibitions include: Huey, Lisson Gallery,  New York, 2021; Boogey Men, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, 2021; and Brier Patch, commissioned by Madison Square Park Conservancy, New York, 2022. 

Dozie Kanu (b. 1993, Houston, Texas) is based in Santarém, Portugal. His research focuses on a concept of sculpture that looks at the production of objects in which a tension between their use and their history, memory and materiality is embedded. Kanu’s visual language criticizes western art history canons, subtly and elegantly revealing in the objects narratives involving colonialism and identity, focusing on their diasporic condition. Selected exhibitions include: Midtown, organized by Salon 94 and Maccarone Gallery, Lever House, New York, 2017; FUNCTION, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, 2019; Transformer: A Rebirth of Wonder, 180 The Strand, London, 2019; Recoil (with Cudelice Brazelton IV), International Waters, Brooklyn, New York, 2020; Owe Deed, One Deep, Project Native Informant, London, 2020; Enzo Mari, curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist, Triennale Milano, 2020; Crack Up – Crack Down, Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw, 2020; value order [gentrify.pt], Galeria Madragoa, Lisbon, Portugal, 2021; to prop and ignore, Manual Arts, Los Angeles, California, 2021.

Tau Lewis (b. 1993, Toronto Canada) lives and works in New York, NY. She has exhibited in museums and institutions, including National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON; MoMA PS1, New York, NY; New Museum, New York, NY; Hepworth Wakefield, Wakefield, UK; College Art Galleries, Saskatoon, SK; Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston, ON; the Art Gallery of Mississauga, Mississauga, ON; and the Art Gallery of York University, Toronto, ON. Lewis’ work has been acquired to the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Library Collection, New York, NY; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON; Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, ON; Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, Miami, FL; Grinnell College Museum of Art, Grinnell, IA; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; and Prospect 5, New Orleans, LA . She will present a forthcoming solo exhibition at Haus der Kunst, Munich, DE. 

Kiyan Williams (b. 1991, Newark, NJ) is a visual artist and writer who works fluidly across performance, sculpture, video, and 2d realms. Rooted in a process-driven practice, they are attracted to quotidian, unconventional materials and methods that evoke the historical, political, and ecological forces that shape individual and collective bodies. Williams earned a BA with honors from Stanford University and an MFA in Visual Art from Columbia University. Their work has been exhibited at SculptureCenter, The Jewish Museum, Brooklyn Museum, Socrates Sculpture Park, Recess Art, and The Shed. They have given artist talks and lectures at the Hirshhorn Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Princeton University, Stanford University, Portland State University, The Guggenheim, and Pratt Institute. Williams’ work is in private and public collections including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Location & Exhibition Map

Location

Brooklyn Bridge Park

Get Directions

Click left image to view full exhibition map or here to download a pdf.

Image Gallery

En Español: Sobre la Exposición

Instalada en las orillas de este antiguo puerto marítimo, Black Atlantic (Atlántico Negro) es una exposición inspirada en la diáspora que atraviesa el océano y conecta África con América y Europa. Durante siglos, estas redes transatlánticas han dado lugar a culturas e identidades híbridas y complejas, como las de los cinco artistas incluidos en Black Atlantic (Atlántico Negro). Cada encargo plantea un enfoque creativo singular para la construcción de nuevas identidades y futuros a través de gestos personales del trabajo artesanal, a menudo en diálogo con los procesos de fabricación a gran escala. Los artistas han recurrido tanto a historias globales como a experiencias personales para crear estas obras cautivadoras, que son tan ingeniosas en cuanto a la forma y los materiales como poderosas en sus temas.

Sobre Las Obras de Arte

Agali Awamu (Togetherness) (Agali Awamu [Unión]), 2022
Leilah Babirye (n. 1985, Kampala, Uganda; vive y trabaja en Brooklyn, NY) presenta dos nuevos grupos de esculturas monumentales de madera de pino blanco. La artista talló estas piezas figurativas con una motosierra y a mano, recurriendo a su formación en técnicas tradicionales africanas. Babirye ha embellecido estas figuras mediante procesos de quemado, bruñido y decoración con metales soldados y materiales de desecho encontrados, de modo tal que el residuo se transforma en algo espectacular y, como resultado, deja ver su valor intrínseco. Estas esculturas, a las que llama “reinas trans”, tienen por objeto “alzarse orgullosas como faros de libertad que acogen a una comunidad LGBTQ+ internacional”.

Gulf Stream (La corriente del Golfo), 2022
Hugh Hayden (n. 1983, Dallas, TX; vive y trabaja en Nueva York, NY) ideó la exposición Black Atlantic (Atlántico Negro) y también ha contribuido a ella con esta obra de arte surrealista. Hayden combinó el exterior de un barco de casco trincado con un interior en forma de esqueleto de ballena para crear esta embarcación vacía arrastrada a la orilla. La forma y el título, Gulf Stream (La corriente del Golfo), de esta obra son una referencia y una “reversión” de una pintura de Winslow Homer de 1899, que muestra un personaje Negro solo y en una situación extrema dentro de un bote naufragado en medio del mar, y de la reinterpretación de Kerry James Marshall en 2003, en la que esta escena se convierte en una de ocio. Hayden concibe su escultura como “un barco y un cuerpo, cuyos desconocidos pasajeros pueden haber logrado salvarse, o bien haber sido tragados por el mar”.

On Elbows (Sobre codos), 2022
Dozie Kanu (n. 1993, Houston, TX; vive y trabaja en Santarém, Portugal) ha creado un ensamblaje de objetos surrealistas que pone de relieve las tensiones entre los aspectos públicos y privados del ser. Un recipiente con líquido negro que late al ritmo de un corazón humano y un diván chaise longue (generalmente asociado con el psicoanálisis) fundidos en hormigón aluden a la introspección y a las turbias profundidades del inconsciente individual y colectivo. Las típicas llantas Texan Wire Wheels (también llamadas “codos” o “swangas”) sobre el diván hacen referencia a la vibrante cultura automovilística “SLAB” de Houston, ciudad natal del artista. Kanu describe la tradición de personalizar los coches como “una forma libre y lúdica de diseñar nuestras propias pertenencias materiales, gestos que me parecen sumamente complejos y estratificados dada la relación que los estadounidenses Negros seguimos navegando entre la propiedad y la agencia”.

We pressed our bellies together and kicked our feet, we became something so alien that we no longer had natural predators (Unimos nuestros vientres y agitamos nuestros pies, nos convertimos en algo tan extraño que ya no teníamos depredadores naturales), 2022
We watched humankind evolve as we absorbed into the sea floor, the moon stared down at us and told us the Earth had a heavy heart (Vimos evolucionar a la humanidad mientras nos absorbía el fondo del mar, la luna nos miró fijo y nos contó que la Tierra tenía un corazón acongojado), 2022
We wondered if the angels had abandoned us, or if they simply changed shape without letting us know. Every night creatures vanished, every morning strangers would arrive (Nos preguntamos si los ángeles nos habían abandonado, o si simplemente habían cambiado de forma sin avisarnos. Cada noche desaparecían criaturas, cada mañana llegaban extraños), 2022

Tau Lewis (n. 1993, Toronto, Canadá; vive y trabaja en Brooklyn, NY) tomó inspiración para crear estas tres esculturas de hierro fundido de dos metros de diámetro en su “eterna fascinación por los crinoideos”, una familia de criaturas marinas que incluye a las estrellas, los erizos y los pepinos de mar, así como a sus antepasados prehistóricos. El cuerpo de estos animales está formado por un tallo en forma de discos apilados con diseños únicos. La simetría en sus cinco puntas se ve reflejada en las esculturas de Lewis, que exhiben patrones repetidos que incorporan los símbolos adinkra del oeste de África. Con estas piezas de fundición, la artista “reflexiona sobre el desplazamiento de estos animales ancestrales, la distribución global de sus cuerpos fosilizados y su coexistencia con cuerpos Negros, por encima y por debajo del Atlántico y por toda la diáspora”.

Ruins of Empire (Ruinas del imperio), 2022
Kiyan Williams (n. 1991, Newark, NJ; vive y trabaja en Nueva York, NY) concibe estas “ruinas del imperio” mediante la reinterpretación de un símbolo emblemático de los valores estadounidenses: la Estatua de la Libertad del Capitolio. El monumento de bronce diseñado por Thomas Crawford se alza desde 1863 en Washington D. C., sobre la cúpula del Capitolio de Estados Unidos (una estructura construida con mano de obra esclavizada). La superficie arenosa y seca de la versión de Williams hace que la escultura parezca estar en estado de descomposición y deterioro, “lo que refleja el modo en que los ideales estadounidenses de libertad están ligados al sometimiento, y toma como inspiración un tropo muy utilizado en la ciencia ficción: el de un monumento como la Estatua de la Libertad de Nueva York destruido como símbolo de un mundo arruinado por la degradación ambiental”.

Sobre los Artistas

Leilah Babirye (nacida en 1985 en Kampala, Uganda) es una artista y activista que vive y trabaja en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Estudió arte en la Universidad de Makerere en Kampala, Uganda (2007–2010), y participó en la Residencia Artística de Fire Island en 2015. La artista huyó a Nueva York desde su Uganda natal en 2015 tras haber sido expuesta públicamente como homosexual en un periódico local. En la primavera de 2018, Babirye recibió asilo con el apoyo del Comité de Servicios Africanos y del Proyecto Antiviolencia de Nueva York. En su práctica multidisciplinaria, Babirye toma elementos como madera, cerámica, materiales encontrados y pintura, y los transforma en sujetos figurativos que abordan cuestiones en torno a la identidad, la sexualidad y los derechos humanos. Babirye explora la diversidad de las identidades LGBTQI y confiere a cada sujeto una dignidad majestuosa y una belleza expresiva y tangible. Entre sus exposiciones recientes se encuentran Ebika Bya ba Kuchu mu Buganda (Clanes Kuchu de Buganda) en Gordon Robichaux, Nueva York y Los Ángeles, y en la Stephen Friedman Gallery, Londres;  Flight: A Collective History (Vuelo: una historia colectiva) en el Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, Nueva York (bajo la curaduría de Serubiri Moses); Stonewall 50 en el Contemporary Arts Museum (CAMH), Houston, Texas; y en el Socrates Sculpture Park, donde presentó dos esculturas monumentales por encargo.

Hugh Hayden (n. 1983, Dallas, Texas) considera que la antropomorfización del mundo natural es un lente visceral para explorar la condición humana. Con la madera como medio principal, Hayden recrea objetos cotidianos mediante un proceso de selección, tallado y yuxtaposición con el fin de cuestionar la percepción que tenemos de nosotros mismos, de las demás personas y del entorno. Al trabajar con diversos objetos cargados con historias de capas múltiples, como troncos desechados, maderas nativas poco comunes, árboles de navidad o esculturas africanas de souvenir, el artista suele combinar especies disímiles y así crear nuevas formas compuestas que también reflejan sus complejos orígenes culturales. Hayden vive y trabaja en Nueva York; tiene una maestría en Bellas Artes de la Universidad de Columbia y una licenciatura en Arquitectura de la Universidad Cornell. Entre sus últimas exposiciones individuales, se encuentran: Huey, Lisson Gallery, Nueva York, 2021; Boogey Men (Los hombres del saco), Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, 2021; y Brier Patch (Matorral de espinas), por encargo de la Madison Square Park Conservancy, Nueva York, 2022. 

Dozie Kanu (n. 1993, Houston, Texas) está radicado en Santarém, Portugal. Su investigación se centra en un concepto de escultura que aborda la producción de objetos que entrañan una tensión entre el uso que se les da y su historia, su memoria y su materialidad. El lenguaje visual de Kanu hace una crítica a los cánones de la historia del arte occidental y, con sutileza y elegancia, revela en los objetos narrativas en torno al colonialismo y la identidad, haciendo hincapié en su condición diaspórica. Entre las exposiciones seleccionadas se encuentran: Midtown (Centro de la ciudad), organizada por Salon 94 y Maccarone Gallery, Lever House, Nueva York, 2017; FUNCTION (FUNCIÓN), en The Studio Museum in Harlem, Nueva York, 2019; Transformer: A Rebirth of Wonder (Transformador: el renacer del asombro), en 180 The Strand, Londres, 2019; Recoil (Retroceso) (con Cudelice Brazelton IV), en International Waters, Brooklyn, Nueva York, 2020; Owe Deed, One Deep (Debe hacer un acto, uno profundo), en Project Native Informant, Londres, 2020; Enzo Mari, bajo curaduría de Hans Ulrich Obrist, en Triennale Milano, 2020; Crack Up – Crack Down (Risa y revolución), en el Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Varsovia, 2020; value order [gentrify.pt] (orden de valor [gentrificar.pt]), en la Galeria Madragoa, Lisboa, Portugal, 2021; to prop and ignore (apuntalar e ignorar), en Manual Arts, Los Ángeles, California, 2021.

Tau Lewis (n. 1993, Toronto, Canadá) vive y trabaja en Nueva York, NY. Ha expuesto en museos e instituciones como la National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON; el MoMA PS1 de Nueva York, NY; el New Museum de Nueva York, NY; el Hepworth Wakefield, Wakefield, Inglaterra; las College Art Galleries, Saskatoon, SK; el Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston, ON; la Art Gallery of Mississauga, Mississauga, ON; y la Art Gallery of York University, Toronto, ON. La obra de Lewis se ha incorporado a las colecciones permanentes del Metropolitan Museum of Art, Library Collection, Nueva York, NY; de la National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON; de Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, ON; del Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, FL; del Grinnell College Museum of Art, Grinnell, IA; del Hammer Museum, Los Ángeles, CA; y de Prospect 5, Nueva Orleans, LA. Próximamente, presentará una exposición individual en la Haus der Kunst, Múnich, Alemania. 

Kiyan Williams (n. 1991, Newark, NJ) se dedica a las artes visuales y a la escritura, además de desempeñarse con fluidez como artista del arte performático, la escultura, el video y el 2D. Al arraigarse a una práctica centrada en el proceso, a Williams le interesan los materiales y los métodos cotidianos y poco convencionales que evocan las fuerzas históricas, políticas y ecológicas que dan forma a los cuerpos individuales y colectivos. Williams obtuvo una licenciatura en Bellas Artes con honores en la Universidad de Stanford y una maestría en Artes Visuales en la Universidad de Columbia. Su obra se ha expuesto en el SculptureCenter, el Jewish Museum, el Brooklyn Museum, el Socrates Sculpture Park, Recess Art y The Shed. Ha dado charlas y conferencias artísticas en el Hirshhorn Museum, el Studio Museum in Harlem, la Universidad de Princeton, la Universidad de Stanford, la Universidad Estatal de Portland, el Guggenheim y el Pratt Institute. La obra de Williams se encuentra en colecciones privadas y públicas como la del Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.